Exploring Science Fiction: Time TravelMarco Brambilla’s Evolution (Megaplex), 2010
Today is the day of the Science Fiction Film Festival presented in conjunction with Kelly Richardson: Legion during M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY! Be sure to stop in and enjoy one, or all, of the five films being featured. But before that, let’s travel to the past, into the future, and then back again.
It’s no wonder that time travel is such a highly explored theme in science fiction; our longing to go back in time and to venture into the unknown future is fueled by our inherent desire to experience all the world (and perhaps other worlds?) has to offer. In 1895, H. G. Wells penned The Time Machine, which popularized the concept of time travel—so much so that the book has been adapted into feature films, two made-for-television movies, and numerous comic books. In the epic video work Evolution (Megaplex) by Marco Brambilla (Italian, born 1960), we are presented with a scrolling history of humankind that seamlessly combines the past, present, and future—all through the appropriated lens of box office cinema.
Image courtesy of the artist and Christopher Grimes Gallery.  

Exploring Science Fiction: Time Travel
Marco Brambilla’s Evolution (Megaplex), 2010

Today is the day of the Science Fiction Film Festival presented in conjunction with Kelly Richardson: Legion during M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY! Be sure to stop in and enjoy one, or all, of the five films being featured. But before that, let’s travel to the past, into the future, and then back again.

It’s no wonder that time travel is such a highly explored theme in science fiction; our longing to go back in time and to venture into the unknown future is fueled by our inherent desire to experience all the world (and perhaps other worlds?) has to offer. In 1895, H. G. Wells penned The Time Machine, which popularized the concept of time travel—so much so that the book has been adapted into feature films, two made-for-television movies, and numerous comic books. In the epic video work Evolution (Megaplex) by Marco Brambilla (Italian, born 1960), we are presented with a scrolling history of humankind that seamlessly combines the past, present, and future—all through the appropriated lens of box office cinema.

Image courtesy of the artist and Christopher Grimes Gallery.  

Exploring Science Fiction: Apocalyptic SublimeBarnaby Furnas’s Flood, 2007
Just one more day until the Science Fiction Film Festival presented in conjunction with Kelly Richardson: Legion during M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY. Today we turn our attention to a theme that has long been of interest to artists and science fiction filmmakers alike.
The Sublime has been a favored subject of landscape painters throughout art history. However, at the cusp of the Industrial Revolution, John Martin (British, 1789–1854) painted large-scale depictions of Biblical tales that portrayed a more foreboding and destructive version of Mother Nature, which resonated with his contemporaries. Large crowds consistently waited in queues for blocks to see Martin’s work.
Fast forward more than two hundred years and the public continues to be fascinated with narratives depicting the eradication of life as we know it on Earth. From aliens and zombies to extreme weather, even contemporary artists have turned their attention to the subject. Flood by Barnaby Furnas (American, born 1973) calls to mind epic visions of nature overtaking land in a swath of red anger—a timely and alarming reminder of our place on Earth amid the destruction caused by recent natural disasters.
Image courtesy of Anthony Meier Fine Arts. © 2007 Barnaby Furnas.

Exploring Science Fiction: Apocalyptic Sublime
Barnaby Furnas’s Flood, 2007

Just one more day until the Science Fiction Film Festival presented in conjunction with Kelly Richardson: Legion during M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY. Today we turn our attention to a theme that has long been of interest to artists and science fiction filmmakers alike.

The Sublime has been a favored subject of landscape painters throughout art history. However, at the cusp of the Industrial Revolution, John Martin (British, 1789–1854) painted large-scale depictions of Biblical tales that portrayed a more foreboding and destructive version of Mother Nature, which resonated with his contemporaries. Large crowds consistently waited in queues for blocks to see Martin’s work.

Fast forward more than two hundred years and the public continues to be fascinated with narratives depicting the eradication of life as we know it on Earth. From aliens and zombies to extreme weather, even contemporary artists have turned their attention to the subject. Flood by Barnaby Furnas (American, born 1973) calls to mind epic visions of nature overtaking land in a swath of red anger—a timely and alarming reminder of our place on Earth amid the destruction caused by recent natural disasters.

Image courtesy of Anthony Meier Fine Arts. © 2007 Barnaby Furnas.

Exploring Science Fiction: Man vs. ManFranz Marc’s The Wolves (Balkan War), 1913
There are only two more days until the Science Fiction Film Festival that will be presented in conjunction with Kelly Richardson: Legion during M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY this Friday, but we still have a few more themes to explore.
The Wolves (Balkan War) is based on the artist’s all too personal experience with the subject. War is a common representation of the theme of Man vs. Man and is often projected into the future in science fiction films—presenting a seemingly bleak outlook for man’s ability to resolve conflicts. Here, Franz Marc pits nature against itself, with the wolves serving as an allegory for mankind’s ability to inflict pain and suffering upon its fellow man.

Exploring Science Fiction: Man vs. Man
Franz Marc’s The Wolves (Balkan War), 1913

There are only two more days until the Science Fiction Film Festival that will be presented in conjunction with Kelly Richardson: Legion during M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY this Friday, but we still have a few more themes to explore.

The Wolves (Balkan War) is based on the artist’s all too personal experience with the subject. War is a common representation of the theme of Man vs. Man and is often projected into the future in science fiction films—presenting a seemingly bleak outlook for man’s ability to resolve conflicts. Here, Franz Marc pits nature against itself, with the wolves serving as an allegory for mankind’s ability to inflict pain and suffering upon its fellow man.

Exploring Science Fiction: Man vs. NatureEdward Hicks’s Peaceable Kingdom, ca. 1848
Today we continue to focus on Kelly Richardson: Legion—and the Science Fiction Film Festival that will be presented in conjunction with the exhibition during M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY this Friday—by highlighting themes commonly found in science fiction films and their art historical counterparts. 
In the subgenre of sci-fi horror films, the theme of Man vs. Nature is prevalent, gaining pop culture notoriety through often cheesy “nature strikes back” films. Instead of the threat of Earth being invaded by life from outer space, man is pitted against frankenfish and arachnids on the attack. Edward Hicks (American, 1780–1849), however, aimed to depict a more peaceful existence between man and beast. The scene above—inspired by the Biblical Book of Isaiah’s prophetization of the coming of Christ to a peaceful world in which man and nature cohabitate in harmony—is more hopeful than its filmic counterparts.  

Exploring Science Fiction: Man vs. Nature
Edward Hicks’s Peaceable Kingdom, ca. 1848

Today we continue to focus on Kelly Richardson: Legion—and the Science Fiction Film Festival that will be presented in conjunction with the exhibition during M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY this Friday—by highlighting themes commonly found in science fiction films and their art historical counterparts. 

In the subgenre of sci-fi horror films, the theme of Man vs. Nature is prevalent, gaining pop culture notoriety through often cheesy “nature strikes back” films. Instead of the threat of Earth being invaded by life from outer space, man is pitted against frankenfish and arachnids on the attack. Edward Hicks (American, 1780–1849), however, aimed to depict a more peaceful existence between man and beast. The scene above—inspired by the Biblical Book of Isaiah’s prophetization of the coming of Christ to a peaceful world in which man and nature cohabitate in harmony—is more hopeful than its filmic counterparts.