AK Historypin of the Week
Larkin Administration Building, Seneca Street

The Albright Art Gallery (now the Albright-Knox Art Gallery) held an exhibition of photography in January 1940, which commemorated Buffalo’s vast architectural triumphs. Participants using the Historypin website and mobile app on supported devices can explore photographs and related content about numerous historic sites and buildings featured in the AAG’s 1940 exhibition. Every week, we will feature a pinned location from the Albright-Knox’s Historypin channel and provide detailed information and archival photographs about the site. This week’s pin is the Larkin Administration Building, formerly located on Seneca Street.

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The Larkin Administration Building, located at 680 Seneca Street, was designed in 1904 by architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867–1959) and built for the Larkin Soap Company of Buffalo in 1906. The Larkin Administrative Building was a five-story, dark red brick building that drew international attention for its many innovations, including air conditioning, stained glass windows, metal built-in desk furniture, and suspended toilet bowls. Although it was an office building, it was easily apparent that it was a Frank Lloyd Wright design. Sculptor Richard W. Bock (1865–1949) provided the ornamental globes on the tops of the central exterior piers of the building.

The Larkin Soap Company was founded in Buffalo in 1875 by John D. Larkin (1845–1926). The company would later expand into manufacturing other items, including groceries, dry goods, china, and furniture. The company became a national pioneer of the mail-order business model, with branches in Buffalo, New York, and Chicago. After failing to recover from the Great Depression, the company went into bankruptcy in 1943.

The City of Buffalo sold the building to the Western Trading Corporation in 1949 and, despite local and national protests, the architectural marvel was destroyed. Demolition of the Larkin Administration Building by the Morris and Reimann wrecking company took six months to complete. The demolition process took a very long time due to the fact that the building was built to last forever. Questions still remain today as to why it was torn down. The only part of the building that remains is a single brick pier along a railroad embankment. 
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TOP: Images courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Digital Assets Collection and Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Photographs by Jay W. Baxtresser, Albright Art Gallery staff.
BOTTOM: Screenshot of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s channel on Historypin.

Caught on Camera
September 16, 1988: Joan Mitchell

Artist Joan Mitchell (American, 1925–1992)
was present at the Albright-Knox on September 16, 1988, for the opening of her first major traveling retrospective, Joan Mitchell (September 17–November 6, 1988). The exhibition featured the boldly colorful and dramatic works of this inventive painter, considered internationally to be one of America’s leading Abstract Expressionists.

The exhibition featured approximately sixty paintings spanning thirty-six years of Mitchell’s career, including three works from the Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s permanent collection,  Blue Territory, 1972, and George Went Swimming at Barnes Hole But It Got Too Cold, 1957, both gifts of Seymour H. Knox II, and Rosebud, 1977„ a gift of Mr. and Mrs. Armand J. Castellani. The exhibition was organized by Dr. Judith A Bernstock, a guest curator for the Herbert F. Johnson Museums of Art at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, and was funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

TOP PHOTO: Former AK Chief Curator Michael Auping (left) and Administrator Judy Beecher (seated, left) join artist Joan Mitchell (seated, right) and guests at the Members’ Preview of Joan Mitchell on September 16, 1988.

Content taken from Albright-Knox Art Gallery Annual Report, 1988–1989. Images courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Digital Assets Collection and Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Photographs by Tom Loonan. 

Recent Acquisition HighlightsRodney Graham’s Welsh Oaks #1, 1998In 1979, Graham constructed a monumental, walk-in camera obscura from plywood in a field adjacent to his uncle’s ranch and positioned it in front of twelve different trees for one month. The public was invited to enter the camera to view the luminous image of the tree cast upside-down on the camera’s back wall. In the early 1990s, he again approached the subject, this time using a four-by-five large-format camera to produce a series of sepia-toned images of seven ancient oaks in the English countryside. Learn More Rodney Graham (Canadian, born 1949). Welsh Oaks #1, 1998. Chromogenic print, edition 1/2, 89 x 72 inches (226.1 x 182.9 cm). Albert H. Tracy Fund, by exchange and bequest of John Mortimer Schiff, by exchange, 2013. © Rodney Graham; courtesy Lisson Gallery 

Recent Acquisition Highlights
Rodney Graham’s Welsh Oaks #1, 1998

In 1979, Graham constructed a monumental, walk-in camera obscura from plywood in a field adjacent to his uncle’s ranch and positioned it in front of twelve different trees for one month. The public was invited to enter the camera to view the luminous image of the tree cast upside-down on the camera’s back wall. In the early 1990s, he again approached the subject, this time using a four-by-five large-format camera to produce a series of sepia-toned images of seven ancient oaks in the English countryside. Learn More 

Rodney Graham (Canadian, born 1949). Welsh Oaks #1, 1998. 
Chromogenic print, edition 1/2, 89 x 72 inches (226.1 x 182.9 cm). Albert H. Tracy Fund, by exchange and bequest of John Mortimer Schiff, by exchange, 2013. © Rodney Graham; courtesy Lisson Gallery 

AK Historypin of the Week
Wilcox Mansion, Delaware Avenue

The Albright Art Gallery (now the Albright-Knox Art Gallery) held an exhibition of photography in January 1940, which commemorated Buffalo’s vast architectural triumphs. Participants using the Historypin website and mobile app on supported devices can explore photographs and related content about numerous historic sites and buildings featured in the AAG’s 1940 exhibition. Every week, we will feature a pinned location from the Albright-Knox’s Historypin channel and provide detailed information and archival photographs about the site. This week’s pin is the Wilcox Mansion, located on Delaware Avenue.

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The building that now sits at 641 Delaware Avenue has changed greatly from the time of its original construction. The first thing built on the site was two family residences for officers in the temporary United States military barracks in the 1830s. The Buffalo or Poinsett Barracks, which extended from Main Street to Delaware Avenue and from North Street to Allen Street, were named after Joel Poinsett, the United States Secretary of War from 1837 to 1841. They were designed and constructed by the U.S. Army Engineers, under the direction of General Winfield Scott (1786–1866). The Buffalo or Poinsett Barracks were the largest U.S. military installation in the country at the time of construction.

In 1845, the Buffalo Barracks were moved to Fort Porter and the building was abandoned until 1847, when it was purchased by Joseph Masten (1809–1871), a former Mayor of Buffalo (serving 1843–1844 and 1845–1846) and a former judge of the Superior Court. The building was remodeled by Thomas Tilden (also known as George Thomas Tilden, 1845–1919) in 1863 and converted into a single family home. Masten had Tilden build the portico adorned with Doric columns on Delaware Avenue, making it the main entrance to the building. 

In 1883, Dexter Rumsey (1827–1906) purchased the house as a wedding present for his daughter, Mary Grace, and her husband, Ansley Wilcox (1856–1930). Ansley Wilcox was a lawyer and a civil service reform commissioner. Wilcox was also a founder of the Charity Organization Society and the Fitch Creche, the first day center for working mothers in the United States. Many of these reform groups met regularly at the Wilcox Mansion.

Ansley Wilcox made many improvements to the interior and exterior appearance of the house. In the 1890s, he built a large addition to the back that doubled the size of the residence. Around 1901, he enlisted the assistance of Buffalo architect George Cary (1859–1945) to rebuild the addition and remodel the interior. The addition consisted of a Gothic Revival morning room and a classical dining room, which contained intricate Georgian Revival woodwork details. During Ansley’s ownership of the property, the estate was visited by many prominent individuals, including President William Howard Taft and Secretary of State Philander Knox.

In 1901, the mansion became a monument of national importance due a horrible tragedy. After the shooting of President William McKinley at the Pan-American Exposition on September 6, Vice President Theodore Roosevelt traveled to Buffalo to be present in the event that the wound was fatal. Since Roosevelt was a close friend of Wilcox, he stayed at the Wilcox Mansion during this time. When President McKinley died on September 14, 1901, Roosevelt took the oath of office in the library of the Wilcox Mansion at 3:30 pm to become the twenty-sixth president of the United States.

In 1966, the house—which is the best remaining example of the Greek Revival style in Buffalo—was named a National Historic Site. The building is currently a museum, operated by the Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Site Foundation, Inc., on behalf of the National Park Service and the United States Department of the Interior. The library in which Roosevelt was sworn into office has been remodeled back to its appearance at the time of that momentous event.
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TOP: Image courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Digital Assets Collection and Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Photograph by Jay W. Baxtresser, Albright Art Gallery staff.
BOTTOM: Screenshot of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s channel on Historypin.

Caught on CameraJuly 1951: Delaware Park Rose Garden Art ShowDuring the summer of 1951, the Albright Art Gallery sponsored the second annual Rose Garden Art Show. This sidewalk sale and exhibition of artwork by local artists occurred in the Delaware Park Rose Garden on July 24 and 25, from 6 pm until dark. One of the main draws of the exhibition was that featured art was priced for the “average pocketbook.”
The art show was open to all ages and urged all artists, amateur or professional, to bring their paintings, sculptures, and sketches to the open air show in the park. The exhibition featured not only art, but also included a variety of musical and dramatic entertainment. The 1951 Rose Garden Art Show featured more than 150 artists. More than 5,000 people attended and more than 200 artworks were sold.
The original 1950 art show was organized by Edgar C. Schenck, Director of the Albright Art Gallery, and the second show in 1951 was organized by James Vullo, an instructor at the Buffalo Art Institute. On the evenings of July 24 and 25, 1951, Mrs. Sydney Owen Jennings sketched portraits of visitors to the exhibit, including AAG Director Edgar Schenck (above).
Photo scanned from Albright Art Gallery, Gallery Notes, Annual Report, Volume XV, No. 3, 1949–1952, October 1951. Image courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Digital Assets Collection and Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery

Caught on Camera
July 1951: Delaware Park Rose Garden Art Show

During the summer of 1951, the Albright Art Gallery sponsored the second annual Rose Garden Art Show. This sidewalk sale and exhibition of artwork by local artists occurred in the Delaware Park Rose Garden on July 24 and 25, from 6 pm until dark. One of the main draws of the exhibition was that featured art was priced for the “average pocketbook.”

The art show was open to all ages and urged all artists, amateur or professional, to bring their paintings, sculptures, and sketches to the open air show in the park. The exhibition featured not only art, but also included a variety of musical and dramatic entertainment. The 1951 Rose Garden Art Show featured more than 150 artists. More than 5,000 people attended and more than 200 artworks were sold.

The original 1950 art show was organized by Edgar C. Schenck, Director of the Albright Art Gallery, and the second show in 1951 was organized by James Vullo, an instructor at the Buffalo Art Institute. On the evenings of July 24 and 25, 1951, Mrs. Sydney Owen Jennings sketched portraits of visitors to the exhibit, including AAG Director Edgar Schenck (above).

Photo scanned from Albright Art Gallery, Gallery Notes, Annual Report, Volume XV, No. 3, 1949–1952, October 1951. Image courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Digital Assets Collection and Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery

Sol LeWitt, Wall Drawing #1268: Scribbles: Staircase (AKAG), conceived 2006; executed 2010
If you missed AK Contemporary, a lecture and documentary film series focusing on contemporary artists on Friday, September 5, as part of M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY, read on to learn about the Conceptual artist Sol LeWitt and his installation on view at the Albright-Knox.
There is perhaps no one in the history of art that better embodied the notion of Conceptualism than Sol LeWitt. While playing a key role in formulating and defining what “Conceptualism” is in artistic terms, he also successfully and consistently incorporated the tenets of Conceptualism into his art and daily working practice. 
Throughout his career, LeWitt created various types of works, including books, prints, wall drawings, and sculptures he called “structures.” His first wall drawing, created in 1969, involved the simple act of drawing lines on the wall of a New York gallery. The artist returned to a new form of wall drawing in the last years of his life. These later drawings, known as “scribble drawings,” are composed of hand-drawn graphite scribbles on a wall surface. 
Wall Drawing #1268: Scribbles: Staircase (AKAG), LeWitt’s scribble wall drawing currently on view in the stairwell that connects the 1962 Knox and 1905 Albright Buildings, holds the distinction of being the artist’s last and largest scribble drawing. While the discussions for the acquisition and installation of this work happened in 2006, along with the work’s initial conception by the artist, the work was executed in 2010, after the artist’s death, by a team of artists from LeWitt’s studio and a crew of artists hired by the Albright-Knox. 
The work covers more than 2,200 square feet of wall surface and is composed of millions of scribbles created by 1,717 graphite pencils. It took sixteen artists fifty-four days, or 5,026 hours, to complete the work, which was unveiled on October 16, 2010, and will be on view indefinitely.***Sol LeWitt (American, 1928–2007). Wall Drawing #1268: Scribbles: Staircase (AKAG), conceived 2006; executed 2010. Graphite on three walls, dimensions variable. Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, 2007. © 2014 The LeWitt Estate / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph by Tom Loonan.

Sol LeWitt, Wall Drawing #1268: Scribbles: Staircase (AKAG), conceived 2006; executed 2010

If you missed AK Contemporary, a lecture and documentary film series focusing on contemporary artists on Friday, September 5, as part of M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY, read on to learn about the Conceptual artist Sol LeWitt and his installation on view at the Albright-Knox.

There is perhaps no one in the history of art that better embodied the notion of Conceptualism than Sol LeWitt. While playing a key role in formulating and defining what “Conceptualism” is in artistic terms, he also successfully and consistently incorporated the tenets of Conceptualism into his art and daily working practice. 

Throughout his career, LeWitt created various types of works, including books, prints, wall drawings, and sculptures he called “structures.” His first wall drawing, created in 1969, involved the simple act of drawing lines on the wall of a New York gallery. The artist returned to a new form of wall drawing in the last years of his life. These later drawings, known as “scribble drawings,” are composed of hand-drawn graphite scribbles on a wall surface. 

Wall Drawing #1268: Scribbles: Staircase (AKAG), LeWitt’s scribble wall drawing currently on view in the stairwell that connects the 1962 Knox and 1905 Albright Buildings, holds the distinction of being the artist’s last and largest scribble drawing. While the discussions for the acquisition and installation of this work happened in 2006, along with the work’s initial conception by the artist, the work was executed in 2010, after the artist’s death, by a team of artists from LeWitt’s studio and a crew of artists hired by the Albright-Knox. 

The work covers more than 2,200 square feet of wall surface and is composed of millions of scribbles created by 1,717 graphite pencils. It took sixteen artists fifty-four days, or 5,026 hours, to complete the work, which was unveiled on October 16, 2010, and will be on view indefinitely.

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Sol LeWitt (American, 1928–2007). Wall Drawing #1268: Scribbles: Staircase (AKAG), conceived 2006; executed 2010. Graphite on three walls, dimensions variable. Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, 2007. © 2014 The LeWitt Estate / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph by Tom Loonan.

AK Historypin of the Week
Porter-Allen House, Niagara Street

The City of Buffalo, New York, possesses a remarkable number of architectural masterpieces from the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Recognizing the rich architectural and planning heritage, the Albright Art Gallery (now the Albright-Knox Art Gallery) held an exhibition of photography in January 1940, which commemorated these vast architectural triumphs. More than 120 photographs were displayed in the exhibition, which was organized by Henry-Russell Hitchcock, the dean of American architectural historians, with the assistance of Gordon Bailey Washburn, former director of the Albright Art Gallery.

Participants using the Historypin website and mobile app on supported devices can explore photographs and related content about numerous historic buildings featured in the AAG’s 1940 exhibition. Every week, we will feature a pinned location from the Albright-Knox’s Historypin channel and provide detailed information and archival photographs about the site. This week’s pin is the Porter-Allen House, located on Niagara Street.

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Peter Buell Porter (17731844) was an American lawyer, soldier, and politician who served as United States Secretary of War from 1828 to 1829, and was one of the major figures in establishing Western New York. His house (now known as the Porter-Allen House) located at 1191 Niagara Street, between Ferry and Breckenridge Streets, was composed of several structures, including a summerhouse, a fishpond, and an orchard, and was situated on more than five acres of land along the Niagara River. During Porter’s ownership of the property, the estate was visited by many prominent individuals, including former President John Quincy Adams, DeWitt Clinton, and Seneca orator Red Jacket, as well as many military personnel.

The estate was purchased around 1837 by Lewis Fahey Allen, the secretary and financial manager of the Western Ensurance Company. It remained the Allen family home for over fifty years. During Allen’s ownership of the property, the estate was visited by former Presidents Millard Fillmore and Grover Cleveland (Allen was his uncle!).

In the early 1900s, after Allen’s death, the property was sold to E. R. Thomas, who built an automobile factory on the site. E. R. Thomas Motor Company was a manufacturer of motorized bicycles, motorized tricycles, motorcycles, and automobiles in Buffalo, New York, between 1900 and 1919.

The home was eventually demolished in 1911. Rich Products Corporation is now located on the property.

TOP: Image courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Digital Assets Collection and Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery. BOTTOM: Screenshot of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s channel on Historypin.

Caught on Camera
Beyond/In Western New York 2010: Alternating Currents

As we welcome Shark Girl, 2013, by Casey Riordan Millard, a product of the Albright-Knox’s Public Art Initiative with Erie County and the City of Buffalo, we highlight past partnerships the Albright-Knox Art Gallery has forged to bring innovative public art to Buffalo.

Beyond/In Western New York 2010: Alternating Currents was an exhibition of contemporary art organized through a curatorial collaboration of twelve regional museums and galleries. More than one hundred artists from Western New York and beyond created works addressing the theme “Alternating Currents,” with its implications of technology, energy, and power.

Many of these pieces were public artworks that were placed temporarily or permanently throughout Buffalo. Highlighted here are three of the amazing public works featured in this exhibition.

—Kim Adams, a Canadian-born sculptural artist, created an intricate and alluring piece titled Optic Nerve, 2010. Adams punched thousands of holes, with no specific design, into a 2010 Ford Transit. Illuminated at night, Optic Nerve enticed viewers to find a pattern in the intentional chaos of light. Adams shows that the industrial/commercial object can be a positive outlet for creativity, innovation, and playfulness. This work was on view in the parking lot of Babeville on Delaware Avenue, home of Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center.

—Fastwürms’s work portrays the artists’ affinity with nature and its inhabitants. Kim Kozzi and Dai Skuse, members of the artists’ collective known as Fastwürms,  created a large sculpture titled Owl. This work evokes both the naturalistic, being based on the long-eared owl (Asio otus), as well as the commercial, through a flawless paint job reminiscent of muscle cars and speedboats. Owl, standing at a height of six feet, was perched above the entrance to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, peering down at visitors with its LED eyes. The connection of technology to the natural world suggests that a new exploration of sustainable energy systems is needed to harmonize with nature. 

—Reinhard Reitzenstein’s To Have a Grip on the Earth So That the Whole of This Globe Can Quiver, 2010, was installed as a public artwork at the edge of Buffalo’s historic Larkin District and remains on view today. Reitzenstein’s sculpture portrays an electrical tower curving back into the earth. Once again, the relationship of industry and nature is examined as the artist alludes to an unfinished idea pursued by Nikola Tesla, inventor of alternating current. Tesla envisioned using the earth as a transmitter for electricity, an idea that is reflected through the merging of the electrical tower with the ground itself. The tower’s stance (with its “head” in the “sand”) could also be interpreted as a statement of avoidance of alternative energy sources.

The Albright-Knox, in partnership with Erie County and the City of Buffalo, will present a variety of public art installations as part of the Public Art Initiative, established in 2013. Shark Girl, 2013, by Casey Riordan Millard, is currently on view at Canalside in downtown Buffalo. 

Images courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Digital Assets Collection, Buffalo, New York. 1. Photograph of Kim Adams’s Optic Nerve by Biff Heinrich. 2. Photograph of Fastwürms’s Owl by Tom Loonan. 3. Photograph of Fastwürms’s Owl by Nancy J. Parisi. 4. Photograph of Reinhard Reitzenstein’s To Have a Grip on the Earth So That the Whole of This Globe Can Quiver by Biff Heinrich.

#InsideAK
A Day in the Life of Andrew from the Buildings and Grounds Department

1. Hi there, this is Andrew and I am very excited to take over the AK’s Instagram account today. I am a member of the Buildings and Grounds Department. My job allows me to explore many areas of the museum that the public (and some staff!) never get to see. The space above the main sculpture court is hands-down my favorite place within the gallery. There are countless signatures and notes inscribed onto the Carnegie steel and drywall from past maintenance men. It is a constant reminder of just how old and interesting the museum’s building truly is. Also, most of the notes are not kid-friendly and hilarious! 

2.  In order to work in the Buildings and Grounds Department at the AK, you must also be a bit of a daredevil. A handful of artwork installations often require wire and supports mounted from the crawlspace above particular galleries. For example, I recently captured this photo directly above Gallery 5 in the 1905 Albright Building. Please keep in mind that falling off the wooden support beams means falling through the gallery ceiling below. So one needs to be ever mindful of where he or she steps! 

3. In case none of you have seen it, the museum’s campus is incredibly beautiful in the early morning hours. This is the east wall of the Auditorium, as the sun is starting to rise. 

4. This is our table saw blade and it plays a rather important role in the AK’s Buildings and Grounds Department. It is the starting point of all pedestals, cabinets, plinths, and display cases that will eventually support and display the museum’s amazing Fine Art Collection. My boss, Ken, is a wood-working master and an incredible resource to learn from. I am lucky to work for him and alongside so many other talented and hardworking people. 

5. In my final #InsideAK post, I wanted to share one of the best experiences I have had while working here at the AK. Last summer, I was able to assist in the tiling and grouting of the sculpture “Underlife,” 2012–13, with the artist, Mr. Jason Middlebrook himself. Jason is a pretty cool cat and it was super fun to work with him. That, coupled with the magnificence of the finished piece, made this an incredible project to work on! Thank you for spending the day with me!

Follow the Albright-Knox on Instagram (@AlbrightKnox) for more behind-the-scenes photos!

Photographs by Andrew Mayer. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery

AK Historypin of the Week
Buffalo Public Library, Washington Street

The city of Buffalo, New York, possesses a remarkable number of architectural masterpieces from the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Recognizing the rich architectural and planning heritage, the Albright Art Gallery (now the Albright-Knox Art Gallery) held an exhibition of photography in January 1940, which commemorated these vast architectural triumphs. More than 120 photographs were displayed in the exhibition, which was organized by Henry-Russell Hitchcock, the dean of American architectural historians, with the assistance of Gordon Bailey Washburn, former director of the Albright Art Gallery.

Participants using the Historypin website and mobile app on supported devices can explore photographs and related content about numerous historic buildings featured in the AAG’s 1940 exhibition. Every week, we will feature a pinned location from the Albright-Knox’s Historypin channel and provide detailed information and archival photographs about the site. This week’s pin is the Buffalo Public Library, located on Washington Street.

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The origins of the Buffalo Public Library date back to 1835, when it was founded as the Young Men’s Association. The YMA (not to be confused with the Young Men’s Christian Association) was a private subscription library for paid members. In 1883, the Association’s members began raising funds for a new building and held an architectural competition. After competing with many notable architects, including Henry Hobson Richardson, Cyrus L. W. Eidlitz (1853–1921) won with his design. 

The building was constructed between 1884 and 1887. In 1886, the Association changed its name to “The Buffalo Library” and remained a private library for the next decade. In 1897, The Buffalo Library gave its collection to the citizens of Buffalo. The doors of the Buffalo Public Library were open and it was free for use by the public. The building housed the Buffalo Fine Arts Academy from 1887 to 1905, until the construction on the Albright Art Gallery building was completed. During this time, the BFAA opened an art school which was merged with the Students’ Art Club to form the Art Students’ League in 1891. 

In 1963, construction began on the current location of the Buffalo & Erie County Public Library’s Central Library building and its doors opened to the public in October 1964. The Second Court House, or the Old Erie County Court House, preceded the building on the Washington Street site opposite Court House Park or Courthouse Square, now known as Lafayette Square. 
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The Central Library is home not only to great literature, but also hosts great art. From August 17 to August 22, 2014, Tape Art, a collective of artists based in Providence, Rhode Island, created a mural titled Buffalo Caverns on the north wall of the Central Library branch of the Buffalo & Erie County Public Library. This project is part of the Public Art Initiative, an innovative partnership between the Albright-Knox, Erie County, and the City of Buffalo. The mural is on view through August 29, 2014.

TOP: Image courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Digital Assets Collection and Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Photograph by Jay W. Baxstresser, Albright Art Gallery Staff.
BOTTOM: Screenshot of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s channel on Historypin.