DECADE Theme Preview: L.A. AngelsWork 4: Justin Beal’s Untitled, 2010
Justin Beal is one of a group of Los Angeles artists who create works that involve darkly funny, wicked, and satirical themes. In his untitled sculpture, two reflective panels are wrapped tightly with black plastic wrap. Beal, in essence, transforms a functional object—a mirror—into a non-functional object, while simultaneously referencing eroticism and bondage.
© 2010 Justin Beal

DECADE Theme Preview: L.A. Angels
Work 4: Justin Beal’s Untitled, 2010

Justin Beal is one of a group of Los Angeles artists who create works that involve darkly funny, wicked, and satirical themes. In his untitled sculpture, two reflective panels are wrapped tightly with black plastic wrap. Beal, in essence, transforms a functional object—a mirror—into a non-functional object, while simultaneously referencing eroticism and bondage.

© 2010 Justin Beal

DECADE Theme Preview: L.A. AngelsWork 3: Liz Larner’s 2001, 2001
Liz Larner’s large-scale fiberglass and steel geometric sculpture 2001 is coated in automotive paint, giving the work an iridescent quality that makes it appear to change color from green to purple, depending on the angle at which it is viewed. Larner is part of a group of Los Angeles–based artists who use elements of dark humor in their creations. Some viewers are unsure how to feel about this sculpture, with its part-playful, part-foreboding, and slightly sinister qualities.
Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles. © Liz Larner

DECADE Theme Preview: L.A. Angels
Work 3: Liz Larner’s 2001, 2001

Liz Larner’s large-scale fiberglass and steel geometric sculpture 2001 is coated in automotive paint, giving the work an iridescent quality that makes it appear to change color from green to purple, depending on the angle at which it is viewed. Larner is part of a group of Los Angeles–based artists who use elements of dark humor in their creations. Some viewers are unsure how to feel about this sculpture, with its part-playful, part-foreboding, and slightly sinister qualities.

Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles. © Liz Larner

DECADE Theme Preview: L.A. AngelsWork 2: Jim Isermann’s Untitled (0397), 1997
One of the themes in the art created in Los Angeles during the middle of the twentieth century is fine art that embraces elements from the field of craft. For Untitled (0397), Jim Isermann wove brightly colored cotton into a large-scale sculptural form. By merging elements of craft design with traditional art techniques, Isermann created an abstract sculptural work that is both playful and engaging.
© 1997 Jim Isermann

DECADE Theme Preview: L.A. Angels
Work 2: Jim Isermann’s Untitled (0397), 1997

One of the themes in the art created in Los Angeles during the middle of the twentieth century is fine art that embraces elements from the field of craft. For Untitled (0397), Jim Isermann wove brightly colored cotton into a large-scale sculptural form. By merging elements of craft design with traditional art techniques, Isermann created an abstract sculptural work that is both playful and engaging.

© 1997 Jim Isermann

DECADE Theme Preview: L.A. AngelsWork 1: Ed Moses’s Blue Velvet, 2008
While many believe that the center of the art world is New York, a strong contemporary art scene also exists in Los Angeles. The DECADE exhibition theme L.A. Angels features works by Los Angeles–based artists, most of which were created during the middle of the twentieth century, the period when the city’s contemporary art scene was at its peak.
Ed Moses—a member of a group of Los Angeles–based artists known as the Cool School—creates works in the abstract expressionist style. While non-objective, surface and process are a focus in much of his work. In the abstract diptych painting Blue Velvet, one can almost see the hands of the artist at work on the canvas, which is complete with vertical streaks of blue and green that appear to radiate light.
This is the last theme preview for DECADE, which closes this Sunday, January 6. Select works will be on view for a little while longer in the 1962 Knox Building as new exhibitions are installed upstairs. 
Image © 2008 Ed Moses

DECADE Theme Preview: L.A. Angels
Work 1: Ed Moses’s Blue Velvet, 2008

While many believe that the center of the art world is New York, a strong contemporary art scene also exists in Los Angeles. The DECADE exhibition theme L.A. Angels features works by Los Angeles–based artists, most of which were created during the middle of the twentieth century, the period when the city’s contemporary art scene was at its peak.

Ed Moses—a member of a group of Los Angeles–based artists known as the Cool School—creates works in the abstract expressionist style. While non-objective, surface and process are a focus in much of his work. In the abstract diptych painting Blue Velvet, one can almost see the hands of the artist at work on the canvas, which is complete with vertical streaks of blue and green that appear to radiate light.

This is the last theme preview for DECADE, which closes this Sunday, January 6. Select works will be on view for a little while longer in the 1962 Knox Building as new exhibitions are installed upstairs. 

Image © 2008 Ed Moses

DECADE Duo: Robert Gober and Felix Gonzalez-Torres

Robert Gober’s The Inverted Sink, 1985, and Felix Gonzalez-Torres’s Untitled (Double Portrait), 1991, both featured in DECADE: Contemporary Collecting 2002–2012, demonstrate how artists can use their work to make political statements—in this case, about homosexuality and the AIDS epidemic—in a simple and subtle, yet powerful, manner.

For his work The Inverted Sink, Robert Gober enlarged and altered a domestic object, transforming it into a serene, yet commanding, abstract sculpture. Gober intentionally chose a sink as subject matter—sinks are used for sanitary purposes and this work was created at a time when the fear of AIDS was at its height, with much focus on cleanliness and fears of spreading the disease.

Felix Gonzalez-Torres’s conceptual work Untitled (Double Portrait) consists of a never-ending stack of paper placed on the museum floor, from which guests are invited to “please take only one.” The gold double-circle image printed on each sheet is representative of two like people in solidarity and love. In 1991, it made a subtle, yet powerful, statement in support of the homosexual lifestyle at a time when that lifestyle was publicly linked to fears associated with the spread of disease.

DECADE Theme Preview: “Sculpture in the Expanded Field”Work 5: Jaume Plensa’s Laura, 2012
The newest addition to the Albright-Knox’s outdoor campus is Jaume Plensa’s Laura. This large-scale work depicts the head of a young girl with a contemplative expression. As if in tribute to the classical architecture of the museum’s 1905 Albright Building, Laura was constructed by interweaving white marble and then connected directly to the building’s portico, making the sculpture appear to be an extension of the architecture. 
View Photos of the Installation of Jaume Plensa’s Laura
Image © 2012 Jaume Plensa

DECADE Theme Preview: “Sculpture in the Expanded Field”
Work 5: Jaume Plensa’s Laura, 2012

The newest addition to the Albright-Knox’s outdoor campus is Jaume Plensa’s Laura. This large-scale work depicts the head of a young girl with a contemplative expression. As if in tribute to the classical architecture of the museum’s 1905 Albright Building, Laura was constructed by interweaving white marble and then connected directly to the building’s portico, making the sculpture appear to be an extension of the architecture. 

View Photos of the Installation of Jaume Plensa’s Laura

Image © 2012 Jaume Plensa

DECADE Theme Preview: “Sculpture in the Expanded Field”Work 4: Do Ho Suh’s Karma, 2010
Viewed from a distance, Do Ho Suh’s Karma appears to be a minimalist sculptural line curving up toward the sky. Upon closer inspection, one sees that the sculpture is composed of a human figure that carries, on his shoulders, a series of crouching figures, one on top of the other, each one smaller than the one below, with each figure holding his hands over the eyes of the figure he is perched upon. The artist may be making a statement about humanity and the fact that each of us relies on others and that we all figuratively—and, in the case of this sculpture, literally—stand on the shoulders of those who came before us.
Image © 2010 Do Ho Suh

DECADE Theme Preview: “Sculpture in the Expanded Field”
Work 4: Do Ho Suh’s Karma, 2010

Viewed from a distance, Do Ho Suh’s Karma appears to be a minimalist sculptural line curving up toward the sky. Upon closer inspection, one sees that the sculpture is composed of a human figure that carries, on his shoulders, a series of crouching figures, one on top of the other, each one smaller than the one below, with each figure holding his hands over the eyes of the figure he is perched upon. The artist may be making a statement about humanity and the fact that each of us relies on others and that we all figuratively—and, in the case of this sculpture, literally—stand on the shoulders of those who came before us.

Image © 2010 Do Ho Suh

DECADE Theme Preview: “Sculpture in the Expanded Field”Work 3: Nancy Rubins’s Stainless Steel, Aluminum, Monochrome I, Built to Live Anywhere, at Home Here, 2010–11
Nancy Rubins’s Stainless Steel, Aluminum, Monochrome I, Built to Live Anywhere, at Home Here is composed of fifty-nine canoes, two row boats, and one jon boat assembled with steel cables to form a massive, abstract sculptural work. Rubins often incorporates everyday objects into her work, thereby demonstrating how simple, functional materials can become beautiful works of art.
Image © 2010 Nancy Rubins

DECADE Theme Preview: “Sculpture in the Expanded Field”
Work 3: Nancy Rubins’s Stainless Steel, Aluminum, Monochrome I, Built to Live Anywhere, at Home Here, 2010–11

Nancy Rubins’s Stainless Steel, Aluminum, Monochrome I, Built to Live Anywhere, at Home Here is composed of fifty-nine canoes, two row boats, and one jon boat assembled with steel cables to form a massive, abstract sculptural work. Rubins often incorporates everyday objects into her work, thereby demonstrating how simple, functional materials can become beautiful works of art.

Image © 2010 Nancy Rubins

DECADE Theme Preview: “Sculpture in the Expanded Field”Work 2: Leo Villareal’s Light Matrix, 2005
Leo Villareal’s Light Matrix is composed of three hundred and sixty clusters of twenty-five super-bright white LED lights that continuously display patterns of light—random in order and length—on the exterior of the Gallery’s Auditorium. This work demonstrates the trend of using non-traditional materials in contemporary sculpture, with Villareal using lights and computer software the way other artists use paint and a canvas, or wire and clay.
Image © 2005 Leo Villareal

DECADE Theme Preview: “Sculpture in the Expanded Field”
Work 2: Leo Villareal’s Light Matrix, 2005

Leo Villareal’s Light Matrix is composed of three hundred and sixty clusters of twenty-five super-bright white LED lights that continuously display patterns of light—random in order and length—on the exterior of the Gallery’s Auditorium. This work demonstrates the trend of using non-traditional materials in contemporary sculpture, with Villareal using lights and computer software the way other artists use paint and a canvas, or wire and clay.

Image © 2005 Leo Villareal

DECADE Theme Preview: “Sculpture in the Expanded Field”Work 1: Jim Hodges’s look and see, 2005
Traditional notions of sculpture are largely rejected by contemporary artists. Instead, the works they create are often large in scale, made of non-traditional materials, and expand well beyond a museum’s pedestals or even its walls. The DECADE exhibition theme “Sculpture in the Expanded Field”* explores this expansion of sculptural art at the Albright-Knox.
Aptly titled look and see, Jim Hodges’s enormous, s-curved sculpture made from enamel painted on stainless steel is a mix of black, white, mirrored, and cutout shapes that invite viewers to walk around and look through the work. The surrounding landscape and architecture also become part of the sculpture as they are reflected in its’ mirrored surfaces.
Image © 2005 Jim Hodges
* “Sculpture in the expanded field” is a phrase coined in 1979 by Rosalind Krauss in her seminal, eponymous essay.

DECADE Theme Preview: “Sculpture in the Expanded Field”
Work 1: Jim Hodges’s look and see, 2005

Traditional notions of sculpture are largely rejected by contemporary artists. Instead, the works they create are often large in scale, made of non-traditional materials, and expand well beyond a museum’s pedestals or even its walls. The DECADE exhibition theme “Sculpture in the Expanded Field”* explores this expansion of sculptural art at the Albright-Knox.

Aptly titled look and see, Jim Hodges’s enormous, s-curved sculpture made from enamel painted on stainless steel is a mix of black, white, mirrored, and cutout shapes that invite viewers to walk around and look through the work. The surrounding landscape and architecture also become part of the sculpture as they are reflected in its’ mirrored surfaces.

Image © 2005 Jim Hodges

* “Sculpture in the expanded field” is a phrase coined in 1979 by Rosalind Krauss in her seminal, eponymous essay.