6 results for andy goldsworthy

“It’s not like a conventional sculpture. You can’t predict when it’s going to be there or not. It really is made to be seen by chance, and the people who will really see it and understand it will be those that walk that path every day.”

– Andy Goldsworthy discussing his work Path (working title), 2012–ongoing, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, May 15, 2013

Behind the Work:Andy Goldsworthy’s Rising Stone, 2013
Today we begin a new series that digs into the history of works in the Albright-Knox’s Collection. Watch our Tumblr blog every third Monday for more “Behind the Work” posts.
Rising Stone is one of two major works that Andy Goldsworthy recently completed for the Albright-Knox on the museum’s grounds (Learn more about the other project, Path). Love of nature has driven Goldsworthy’s career, during which he has created many works in the landscape using natural materials such as wood, rocks, leaves, and snow.
Rising Stone consists of a boulder that was buried on the Hoyt Lake side of the museum on May 15, 2013. Only a small portion of the top of the boulder is visible, but, with the changing seasons and nature running its course, the stone will rise from the earth, becoming more and more visible as the years pass.
Little can be gleaned from looking at the boulder as it appears today, but we can tell you that it was formed from glacial erratic granite and weighs 30,000 pounds, or fifteen tons. While Goldsworthy is British, the boulder is local, having been procured for this project from a farm in Marilla, New York.
IMAGE: Installation of Andy Goldsworthy’s Rising Stone, 2013. Image courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Media Collection. Photograph by Tom Loonan.

Behind the Work:
Andy Goldsworthy’s Rising Stone, 2013

Today we begin a new series that digs into the history of works in the Albright-Knox’s Collection. Watch our Tumblr blog every third Monday for more “Behind the Work” posts.

Rising Stone is one of two major works that Andy Goldsworthy recently completed for the Albright-Knox on the museum’s grounds (Learn more about the other project, Path). Love of nature has driven Goldsworthy’s career, during which he has created many works in the landscape using natural materials such as wood, rocks, leaves, and snow.

Rising Stone consists of a boulder that was buried on the Hoyt Lake side of the museum on May 15, 2013. Only a small portion of the top of the boulder is visible, but, with the changing seasons and nature running its course, the stone will rise from the earth, becoming more and more visible as the years pass.

Little can be gleaned from looking at the boulder as it appears today, but we can tell you that it was formed from glacial erratic granite and weighs 30,000 pounds, or fifteen tons. While Goldsworthy is British, the boulder is local, having been procured for this project from a farm in Marilla, New York.

IMAGE: Installation of Andy Goldsworthy’s Rising Stone, 2013. Image courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Media Collection. Photograph by Tom Loonan.

Share Your Images Inspired by Andy Goldsworthy

As our contemporary photography photo-sharing campaign comes to a close, we are beginning a new, summer-long photo-sharing campaign. This time, we’re asking you to share photos of things you see or make inspired by the work of Andy Goldsworthy, who was just at the Albright-Knox in May to check on his Path and bury his Rising Stone. (Both of these works are now on view on the east side of the Gallery’s Grounds.)

We encourage you to walk the Path, create your own Rain Shadow, make something out of sticks or leaves, or get creative with nature in other ways. Please share the photos of your observations or creations on Instagram or Twitter and include #akgoldsworthy and @albrightknox in your captions. We’ll feature one photo every Friday throughout the summer. (When you share an image, you are giving us permission to repost it, accompanied by your Instagram or Twitter handle.)

Albright-Knox staff members are already getting into the action. The mini rock pile in the photo on the left was created by a member of our Publications department and the re-creation of Goldsworthy’s Path, on the right, was our Education department’s entry into this year’s Art Alive.

Ready, set, share!

Andy Goldsworthy, a Mini-series: Ephemeral Work
Today we continue our mini-series about Andy Goldsworthy’s works, leading up to his visit and talk on May 15.
During the artist’s July 2012 visit to the Albright-Knox, when he created one of the Rain Shadows pictured in a previous post, he also created and photographed this ephemeral work on the Delaware Stairs, exemplifying the beautiful simplicity of many of his works.
Join us for a rare opportunity to hear Goldsworthy talk about his work on Wednesday, May 15, at 7:30 pm. Tickets are $10 for Members, $20 for non-members, and $15 for students and seniors. Learn More and Buy Tickets
Image © Andy Goldsworthy

Andy Goldsworthy, a Mini-series: Ephemeral Work

Today we continue our mini-series about Andy Goldsworthy’s works, leading up to his visit and talk on May 15.

During the artist’s July 2012 visit to the Albright-Knox, when he created one of the Rain Shadows pictured in a previous post, he also created and photographed this ephemeral work on the Delaware Stairs, exemplifying the beautiful simplicity of many of his works.

Join us for a rare opportunity to hear Goldsworthy talk about his work on Wednesday, May 15, at 7:30 pm. Tickets are $10 for Members, $20 for non-members, and $15 for students and seniors. Learn More and Buy Tickets

Image © Andy Goldsworthy

Andy Goldsworthy, a Mini-series: Rain Shadows

On the heels of last week’s post about needing your participation to help complete Andy Goldsworthy’s Path, we are kicking off a mini-series about the artist’s works, leading up to his visit and talk on May 15.

When Goldsworthy comes to the Albright-Knox, he often creates works on the Gallery’s grounds. Due to the transitory nature of his practice, these creations don’t stick around for long, but, lucky for you, we have pictures.

On June 2, 2010, when the artist was in town to work on a project for Beyond/In Western New York 2010, he created one of his famous Rain Shadows at the bottom of the Delaware Stairs. Two years later, he created another Rain Shadow just outside the Elmwood Avenue entrance. Both are pictured above.

Join us for a rare opportunity to hear Goldsworthy talk about his work on Wednesday, May 15, at 7:30 pm. Tickets are $10 for Members, $20 for non-members, and $15 for students and seniors. Learn More and Buy Tickets

Images © Andy Goldsworthy

Participate in the Making of Andy Goldsworthy’s Path
The ephemerality and unpredictability of nature have been at the center of Andy Goldsworthy’s practice since the 1970s. In 2012, the Albright-Knox commissioned the artist to create an outdoor work for the Gallery’s campus. Path, situated on the lawn facing the Delaware Park Rose Garden, comprises a meandering gravel path set in a shaded glade, beneath which lies a curved, riverlike form carved by the artist and his team of masons in granite. Being in and part of nature, the path will reveal itself in different ways at different times of the year and under different weather conditions.
Path was begun last year, but we need your help to complete it. The artist encourages people to walk on the path, as this is an essential part of its compaction. He also encourages people to take photographs of the path at different times of day, especially in the early morning and late afternoon, when it most reveals itself. Please share your photos on Instagram or Twitter and include #akpath and @albrightknox in your caption. We will share all of the photos with the artist so that he can monitor the path’s progress from his home in England.
Goldsworthy will return to the Albright-Knox in mid-May to check on the status of Path and to install another work on the Gallery’s campus, which we’ll post more about in the coming weeks. Join us for a rare opportunity to hear Goldsworthy talk about his work on Wednesday, May 15, at 7:30 pm, in the Gallery’s Auditorium. Tickets are $10 for Members, $20 for non-members, and $15 for students and seniors. Learn More and Buy Tickets
IMAGE: Installation view of Andy Goldsworthy’s Path (working title), 2012–ongoing. Photograph by Pam Hatley.

Participate in the Making of Andy Goldsworthy’s Path

The ephemerality and unpredictability of nature have been at the center of Andy Goldsworthy’s practice since the 1970s. In 2012, the Albright-Knox commissioned the artist to create an outdoor work for the Gallery’s campus. Path, situated on the lawn facing the Delaware Park Rose Garden, comprises a meandering gravel path set in a shaded glade, beneath which lies a curved, riverlike form carved by the artist and his team of masons in granite. Being in and part of nature, the path will reveal itself in different ways at different times of the year and under different weather conditions.

Path was begun last year, but we need your help to complete it. The artist encourages people to walk on the path, as this is an essential part of its compaction. He also encourages people to take photographs of the path at different times of day, especially in the early morning and late afternoon, when it most reveals itself. Please share your photos on Instagram or Twitter and include #akpath and @albrightknox in your caption. We will share all of the photos with the artist so that he can monitor the path’s progress from his home in England.

Goldsworthy will return to the Albright-Knox in mid-May to check on the status of Path and to install another work on the Gallery’s campus, which we’ll post more about in the coming weeks. Join us for a rare opportunity to hear Goldsworthy talk about his work on Wednesday, May 15, at 7:30 pm, in the Gallery’s Auditorium. Tickets are $10 for Members, $20 for non-members, and $15 for students and seniors. Learn More and Buy Tickets

IMAGE: Installation view of Andy Goldsworthy’s Path (working title), 2012–ongoing. Photograph by Pam Hatley.