The Gallery for Small Sculpture is currently home to an exhibition that explores artworks of a particular shape. Over the next few months, we’ll take a closer look at some of the enigmatic works featured in Cubes and Rectangles, Boxes and Containers.

Weight and Permanence
Eric Tillinghast (American, born 1974) is known primarily for creating works in which he uses water as a sculptural element. In many of his sculptures, Tillinghast uses steel bases and forms to house the water, holding it in certain shapes. His goal is to make the viewer question their perception of water as a natural element and a resource.
In Cubes and Rectangles, Boxes and Containers, however, a different sort of Tillinghast work is on view. Not Titled, 1996, is composed of twenty-five steel cubes, with no water element. Here, the artist has created something of weight and permanence, quite the opposite of the lightness and fluidity that water evokes.
IMAGE: © 1996 Eric Tillinghast

The Gallery for Small Sculpture is currently home to an exhibition that explores artworks of a particular shape. Over the next few months, we’ll take a closer look at some of the enigmatic works featured in Cubes and Rectangles, Boxes and Containers.

Weight and Permanence

Eric Tillinghast (American, born 1974) is known primarily for creating works in which he uses water as a sculptural element. In many of his sculptures, Tillinghast uses steel bases and forms to house the water, holding it in certain shapes. His goal is to make the viewer question their perception of water as a natural element and a resource.

In Cubes and Rectangles, Boxes and Containers, however, a different sort of Tillinghast work is on view. Not Titled, 1996, is composed of twenty-five steel cubes, with no water element. Here, the artist has created something of weight and permanence, quite the opposite of the lightness and fluidity that water evokes.

IMAGE: © 1996 Eric Tillinghast

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