Life of Pop: Where Pop Meets Print
This week, we continue to feature works in celebration of the exhibition Sweet Dreams, Baby! Life of Pop, London to Warhol. So far, we have covered a lot of territory, but thanks to the depth of the Gallery’s Collection, we bring you more works from the vaults!
While the name Roy Lichtenstein (American, 1923–1997) is synonymous with the Pop art movement, the artist is most known for a tongue-in-cheek sense of humor that played out on his canvases through the fusion of comic book imagery and magazine advertisements (see: Head—Red and Yellow, 1962).
In addition to working in painting and sculpture, Lichtenstein was an avid printmaker. Throughout the 1960s, Pop artists sought to reach a wider audience through prints, which they executed in large quantities so that consumers could more easily acquire them. Working with large publishing houses, the Pop artists rejected more traditional forms of printmaking—such as etching and engraving—in favor of the more commercial process of screen printing.
While the Gallery holds many examples of Lichtenstein’s graphic works, this print, titled Sandwich and Soda, from the portfolio Ten Works X Ten Painters, 1964, was one of his first Pop art prints. The first print to be made on a surface other than paper, this work on plastic is an example of how Lichtenstein always set himself apart in the medium of printmaking by exploring experimental materials, processes, and a wide range of technical innovations.
IMAGE: © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Life of Pop: Where Pop Meets Print

This week, we continue to feature works in celebration of the exhibition Sweet Dreams, Baby! Life of Pop, London to Warhol. So far, we have covered a lot of territory, but thanks to the depth of the Gallery’s Collection, we bring you more works from the vaults!

While the name Roy Lichtenstein (American, 1923–1997) is synonymous with the Pop art movement, the artist is most known for a tongue-in-cheek sense of humor that played out on his canvases through the fusion of comic book imagery and magazine advertisements (see: Head—Red and Yellow, 1962).

In addition to working in painting and sculpture, Lichtenstein was an avid printmaker. Throughout the 1960s, Pop artists sought to reach a wider audience through prints, which they executed in large quantities so that consumers could more easily acquire them. Working with large publishing houses, the Pop artists rejected more traditional forms of printmaking—such as etching and engraving—in favor of the more commercial process of screen printing.

While the Gallery holds many examples of Lichtenstein’s graphic works, this print, titled Sandwich and Soda, from the portfolio Ten Works X Ten Painters, 1964, was one of his first Pop art prints. The first print to be made on a surface other than paper, this work on plastic is an example of how Lichtenstein always set himself apart in the medium of printmaking by exploring experimental materials, processes, and a wide range of technical innovations.

IMAGE: © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

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