Behind the Work:Andy Goldsworthy’s Rising Stone, 2013
Today we begin a new series that digs into the history of works in the Albright-Knox’s Collection. Watch our Tumblr blog every third Monday for more “Behind the Work” posts.
Rising Stone is one of two major works that Andy Goldsworthy recently completed for the Albright-Knox on the museum’s grounds (Learn more about the other project, Path). Love of nature has driven Goldsworthy’s career, during which he has created many works in the landscape using natural materials such as wood, rocks, leaves, and snow.
Rising Stone consists of a boulder that was buried on the Hoyt Lake side of the museum on May 15, 2013. Only a small portion of the top of the boulder is visible, but, with the changing seasons and nature running its course, the stone will rise from the earth, becoming more and more visible as the years pass.
Little can be gleaned from looking at the boulder as it appears today, but we can tell you that it was formed from glacial erratic granite and weighs 30,000 pounds, or fifteen tons. While Goldsworthy is British, the boulder is local, having been procured for this project from a farm in Marilla, New York.
IMAGE: Installation of Andy Goldsworthy’s Rising Stone, 2013. Image courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Media Collection. Photograph by Tom Loonan.

Behind the Work:
Andy Goldsworthy’s Rising Stone, 2013

Today we begin a new series that digs into the history of works in the Albright-Knox’s Collection. Watch our Tumblr blog every third Monday for more “Behind the Work” posts.

Rising Stone is one of two major works that Andy Goldsworthy recently completed for the Albright-Knox on the museum’s grounds (Learn more about the other project, Path). Love of nature has driven Goldsworthy’s career, during which he has created many works in the landscape using natural materials such as wood, rocks, leaves, and snow.

Rising Stone consists of a boulder that was buried on the Hoyt Lake side of the museum on May 15, 2013. Only a small portion of the top of the boulder is visible, but, with the changing seasons and nature running its course, the stone will rise from the earth, becoming more and more visible as the years pass.

Little can be gleaned from looking at the boulder as it appears today, but we can tell you that it was formed from glacial erratic granite and weighs 30,000 pounds, or fifteen tons. While Goldsworthy is British, the boulder is local, having been procured for this project from a farm in Marilla, New York.

IMAGE: Installation of Andy Goldsworthy’s Rising Stone, 2013. Image courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Media Collection. Photograph by Tom Loonan.

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