Exploring Science Fiction: Man vs. NatureEdward Hicks’s Peaceable Kingdom, ca. 1848
Today we continue to focus on Kelly Richardson: Legion—and the Science Fiction Film Festival that will be presented in conjunction with the exhibition during M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY this Friday—by highlighting themes commonly found in science fiction films and their art historical counterparts. 
In the subgenre of sci-fi horror films, the theme of Man vs. Nature is prevalent, gaining pop culture notoriety through often cheesy “nature strikes back” films. Instead of the threat of Earth being invaded by life from outer space, man is pitted against frankenfish and arachnids on the attack. Edward Hicks (American, 1780–1849), however, aimed to depict a more peaceful existence between man and beast. The scene above—inspired by the Biblical Book of Isaiah’s prophetization of the coming of Christ to a peaceful world in which man and nature cohabitate in harmony—is more hopeful than its filmic counterparts.  

Exploring Science Fiction: Man vs. Nature
Edward Hicks’s Peaceable Kingdom, ca. 1848

Today we continue to focus on Kelly Richardson: Legion—and the Science Fiction Film Festival that will be presented in conjunction with the exhibition during M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY this Friday—by highlighting themes commonly found in science fiction films and their art historical counterparts. 

In the subgenre of sci-fi horror films, the theme of Man vs. Nature is prevalent, gaining pop culture notoriety through often cheesy “nature strikes back” films. Instead of the threat of Earth being invaded by life from outer space, man is pitted against frankenfish and arachnids on the attack. Edward Hicks (American, 1780–1849), however, aimed to depict a more peaceful existence between man and beast. The scene above—inspired by the Biblical Book of Isaiah’s prophetization of the coming of Christ to a peaceful world in which man and nature cohabitate in harmony—is more hopeful than its filmic counterparts.  

  1. albrightknox posted this