Spotlight on Kelly Richardson
Kelly Richardson will be on-site for the next few weeks, working with the Gallery’s staff to install Kelly Richardson: Legion, which takes an extensive look at the artist’s audio-visual works of the past fifteen years. Richardson grew up in Guelph, Ontario, just two hours from Buffalo. While she currently lives in Whitley Bay, England, we like to think of the Albright-Knox as her second home, given that the Gallery holds more of her works in its Collection than any other museum worldwide (three, to be exact).
Drawing on science fiction and horror films, and preexisting art historical narrative devices such as the apocalyptic sublime, Richardson merges photography, film, and video to create large-scale, immersive installations that reconsider our relationship with the natural world. Themes of environmental decay, suburban sprawl, and the uncertainty of space exploration lead to progressive interpretations of the landscape, leaving us to question the impact civilization has had on the natural world.
Over the next few months, we will be featuring works from this exhibition through an exploration of Richardson’s working process. And, if you’re not already planning on it, we invite you to brave the cold to come see this exhibition, which opens next Saturday, February 16. We promise you won’t be disappointed.
Next up: Is it me, or is this room spinning?
IMAGE: Kelly Richardson in front of her work Mariner 9, 2012. Photograph by Colin Davison.

Spotlight on Kelly Richardson

Kelly Richardson will be on-site for the next few weeks, working with the Gallery’s staff to install Kelly Richardson: Legion, which takes an extensive look at the artist’s audio-visual works of the past fifteen years. Richardson grew up in Guelph, Ontario, just two hours from Buffalo. While she currently lives in Whitley Bay, England, we like to think of the Albright-Knox as her second home, given that the Gallery holds more of her works in its Collection than any other museum worldwide (three, to be exact).

Drawing on science fiction and horror films, and preexisting art historical narrative devices such as the apocalyptic sublime, Richardson merges photography, film, and video to create large-scale, immersive installations that reconsider our relationship with the natural world. Themes of environmental decay, suburban sprawl, and the uncertainty of space exploration lead to progressive interpretations of the landscape, leaving us to question the impact civilization has had on the natural world.

Over the next few months, we will be featuring works from this exhibition through an exploration of Richardson’s working process. And, if you’re not already planning on it, we invite you to brave the cold to come see this exhibition, which opens next Saturday, February 16. We promise you won’t be disappointed.

Next up: Is it me, or is this room spinning?

IMAGE: Kelly Richardson in front of her work Mariner 9, 2012. Photograph by Colin Davison.

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