150 Years of Contemporary Art: Realism
The Albright-Knox’s 150 Years of Contemporary Art Lecture Series kicks off tomorrow, Saturday, September 29, with a lecture about Realism, which flourished between the 1840s and the 1890s. The so-called Realist artists rejected past themes such as history, religion, and mythology, and painted what they knew and experienced.
Throughout the course of this series—which continues most Saturdays through March 16, 2013—we will preview each lecture with a special feature, highlighting several things you may know that are related to the topic or time period that the lecture covers, and several things you may find interesting.
Things you may know:
The general public tends not to approve of what’s avant-garde in the art world
The industrial revolution drastically changed both cities and the countryside
In the late nineteenth century, it was unusual for women to wear pants, have short hair, and smoke
What to do if you are holding a bottle of wine in each hand and your hat blows off
Artists sometimes use cartoons to communicate a message
Things you may find interesting:
“Realism” didn’t mean that artists were painting things “realistically”
Where the term “Jurassic” came from
It was a crime to publicly criticize Emperor Napoleon III, but artists found ways to do it anyway!
Which French artist took his grandfather’s advice to “shout loudly and march straight ahead”
In the late nineteenth century, a woman might have to get police permission to wear men’s clothing in public
Learn more at the “Let’s Get Real” lecture with Curator of Education Mariann Smith tomorrow, Saturday, September 29, at 11:15 am. Admission is free for Members and free with Gallery admission for non-members.
IMAGE: Gustave Courbet (French, 1819–1877). La Source de la Loue (The Source of the Loue), ca. 1864. Oil on canvas, 42 1/4 x 54 1/8 inches (107.3 x 137.5 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery. George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, 1959.

150 Years of Contemporary Art: Realism

The Albright-Knox’s 150 Years of Contemporary Art Lecture Series kicks off tomorrow, Saturday, September 29, with a lecture about Realism, which flourished between the 1840s and the 1890s. The so-called Realist artists rejected past themes such as history, religion, and mythology, and painted what they knew and experienced.

Throughout the course of this series—which continues most Saturdays through March 16, 2013—we will preview each lecture with a special feature, highlighting several things you may know that are related to the topic or time period that the lecture covers, and several things you may find interesting.

Things you may know:

  • The general public tends not to approve of what’s avant-garde in the art world
  • The industrial revolution drastically changed both cities and the countryside
  • In the late nineteenth century, it was unusual for women to wear pants, have short hair, and smoke
  • What to do if you are holding a bottle of wine in each hand and your hat blows off
  • Artists sometimes use cartoons to communicate a message

Things you may find interesting:

  • “Realism” didn’t mean that artists were painting things “realistically”
  • Where the term “Jurassic” came from
  • It was a crime to publicly criticize Emperor Napoleon III, but artists found ways to do it anyway!
  • Which French artist took his grandfather’s advice to “shout loudly and march straight ahead”
  • In the late nineteenth century, a woman might have to get police permission to wear men’s clothing in public

Learn more at the “Let’s Get Real” lecture with Curator of Education Mariann Smith tomorrow, Saturday, September 29, at 11:15 am. Admission is free for Members and free with Gallery admission for non-members.

IMAGE: Gustave Courbet (French, 1819–1877). La Source de la Loue (The Source of the Loue), ca. 1864. Oil on canvas, 42 1/4 x 54 1/8 inches (107.3 x 137.5 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery. George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, 1959.

  1. refinnejsetaerc reblogged this from albrightknox and added:
    I don’t like this painting (creeps me out, even more so in “person”) but the article is interesting and this looks like...
  2. albrightknox posted this