Printed Editions in the Sixties and Seventies: LeWitt, Roth, RuschaSol LeWitt’s Autobiography
For Sol LeWitt (American, 1928–2007)—one of the three artists whose works are featured in Printed Editions in the Sixties and Seventies: LeWitt, Roth, Ruscha, on view in the Gallery for Small Sculpture through Sunday, January 4, 2015—artists’ books offered an alternative mode of artistic production. LeWitt’s Autobiography presents a narrative of more than one thousand black-and-white photographs taken by the artist of his New York City loft. Arranged in a grid-like format with nine images to a page, the book is a visual representation of LeWitt’s life and work. Autobiography catalogues virtually every corner, crevice, and object in the artist’s living space, including kitchen utensils, electrical outlets, windows, doors, light fixtures, clocks, and his library.
Image: Sol LeWitt’s Autobiography (New York: Multiples, Inc.; Boston: Lois and Michael K. Torf, 1980). Collection G. Robert Strauss, Jr. Memorial Library, Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Photograph by Tom Loonan.

Printed Editions in the Sixties and Seventies: LeWitt, Roth, Ruscha
Sol LeWitt’s Autobiography

For Sol LeWitt (American, 1928–2007)—one of the three artists whose works are featured in Printed Editions in the Sixties and Seventies: LeWitt, Roth, Ruscha, on view in the Gallery for Small Sculpture through Sunday, January 4, 2015—artists’ books offered an alternative mode of artistic production. LeWitt’s Autobiography presents a narrative of more than one thousand black-and-white photographs taken by the artist of his New York City loft. Arranged in a grid-like format with nine images to a page, the book is a visual representation of LeWitt’s life and work. Autobiography catalogues virtually every corner, crevice, and object in the artist’s living space, including kitchen utensils, electrical outlets, windows, doors, light fixtures, clocks, and his library.

Image: Sol LeWitt’s Autobiography (New York: Multiples, Inc.; Boston: Lois and Michael K. Torf, 1980). Collection G. Robert Strauss, Jr. Memorial Library, Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Photograph by Tom Loonan.

AK Historypin of the Week
Beverly Pepper Exhibition (Fall 1969), Albright-Knox Art Gallery

Participants using the Historypin website and mobile app on supported devices can explore photographs and related content about numerous historic sites and buildings around Buffalo. Every week, we will feature a pinned location from the Albright-Knox’s Historypin channel and provide detailed information and archival photographs about the site. This week’s pin is the 1969 Beverly Pepper exhibition at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery.

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In late September of 1969, an exhibition of twenty sculptures and a group of drawings by Beverley Pepper (American, born 1924), organized by Jan van der Marck of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, opened at the Albright-Knox. From September 30 through November 2, the exhibition Beverly Pepper was installed, under the supervision of the artist, in the Sculpture Garden, on the Elmwood Avenue Terrace, and in the 1905 Knox Building.

The exhibition originally began at Marlbrough-Gerson Gallery, New York, in February 1969. The show then traveled to the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago and Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, and finally made its way to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in September 1969.

One of the artworks displayed near the Elmwood Avenue entrance of the museum is Zig-Zag,1967 (the second piece from the left in the above picture). The sculpture was acquired after the exhibition and is located on the museum’s campus today, in a different location on the same side of the grounds. 
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TOP: Images courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Digital Assets Collection and Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Photographs by Sherwin Greenberg.
BOTTOM: Screenshot of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s channel on Historypin.

Caught on CameraJune 1936: Albright Art School Annual ExhibitionIn the photograph above, Frank Amrose, Assistant to the Albright Art Gallery’s Building Superintendent from 1931–1942, installs artworks for the annual exhibition of artworks by students in the Albright Art School on June 4, 1936. The number of artworks submitted for inclusion in the exhibition was so large that he needed to hang the artworks in double rows on the walls of galleries 1, 2, 3, and 5 in the 1905 Albright Building.
Amrose was installing art for the annual exhibition of the Albright Art School, an event that terminated the year for students and furnished an opportunity for the general public to see not only some of the best work produced by the students in the school, but also the type of instruction given by Buffalo’s most important professional art training center at the time.
The purpose of the Albright Art School was to provide “fundamental fine arts training and a well-rounded background” for students who wished to become teachers, artists, and designers. Courses of various subject matter and lengths of time were offered, the most important of these being the four-year art course which led to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Art Education from the University of Buffalo.
Content taken and photo scanned from Albright Art Gallery’s Gallery Notes, Volume III, No. 8, June 1936. Image courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Digital Assets Collection and Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery

Caught on Camera
June 1936: Albright Art School Annual Exhibition

In the photograph above, Frank Amrose, Assistant to the Albright Art Gallery’s Building Superintendent from 1931–1942, installs artworks for the annual exhibition of artworks by students in the Albright Art School on June 4, 1936. The number of artworks submitted for inclusion in the exhibition was so large that he needed to hang the artworks in double rows on the walls of galleries 1, 2, 3, and 5 in the 1905 Albright Building.

Amrose was installing art for the annual exhibition of the Albright Art School, an event that terminated the year for students and furnished an opportunity for the general public to see not only some of the best work produced by the students in the school, but also the type of instruction given by Buffalo’s most important professional art training center at the time.

The purpose of the Albright Art School was to provide “fundamental fine arts training and a well-rounded background” for students who wished to become teachers, artists, and designers. Courses of various subject matter and lengths of time were offered, the most important of these being the four-year art course which led to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Art Education from the University of Buffalo.

Content taken and photo scanned from Albright Art Gallery’s Gallery Notes, Volume III, No. 8, June 1936. Image courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Digital Assets Collection and Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery

Recent Acquisition HighlightsFlavio Garciandía’s Last Train to De Kooning, 2013Last Train to De Kooning, 2013, is part of a larger body of work that reflects upon the history of postwar painting in the mainstream Euro-American tradition from Garciandía’s position as an inside practitioner and geographical outsider. It is a history he has fully absorbed, but does not embody. Like other works by Garciandía of the past decade, this work pays an affectionate, yet light-hearted, homage to the artist Willem de Kooning (American, 1904–1997) while also probing beneath the surface of de Kooning’s historical body of work. Learn More 
Flavio Garciandía (Cuban, born 1954). Last Train to De Kooning, 2013. Acrylic on canvas. 98 x 77 3/4 inches (248.9 x 197.5 cm). Sherman S. Jewett Fund, by exchange, 2014.

Recent Acquisition Highlights
Flavio Garciandía’s Last Train to De Kooning, 2013

Last Train to De Kooning, 2013, is part of a larger body of work that reflects upon the history of postwar painting in the mainstream Euro-American tradition from Garciandía’s position as an inside practitioner and geographical outsider. It is a history he has fully absorbed, but does not embody. Like other works by Garciandía of the past decade, this work pays an affectionate, yet light-hearted, homage to the artist Willem de Kooning (American, 1904–1997) while also probing beneath the surface of de Kooning’s historical body of work. Learn More 

Flavio Garciandía (Cuban, born 1954). Last Train to De Kooning, 2013. Acrylic on canvas. 98 x 77 3/4 inches (248.9 x 197.5 cm). Sherman S. Jewett Fund, by exchange, 2014.

AK Historypin of the Week
Larkin Administration Building, Seneca Street

The Albright Art Gallery (now the Albright-Knox Art Gallery) held an exhibition of photography in January 1940, which commemorated Buffalo’s vast architectural triumphs. Participants using the Historypin website and mobile app on supported devices can explore photographs and related content about numerous historic sites and buildings featured in the AAG’s 1940 exhibition. Every week, we will feature a pinned location from the Albright-Knox’s Historypin channel and provide detailed information and archival photographs about the site. This week’s pin is the Larkin Administration Building, formerly located on Seneca Street.

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The Larkin Administration Building, located at 680 Seneca Street, was designed in 1904 by architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867–1959) and built for the Larkin Soap Company of Buffalo in 1906. The Larkin Administrative Building was a five-story, dark red brick building that drew international attention for its many innovations, including air conditioning, stained glass windows, metal built-in desk furniture, and suspended toilet bowls. Although it was an office building, it was easily apparent that it was a Frank Lloyd Wright design. Sculptor Richard W. Bock (1865–1949) provided the ornamental globes on the tops of the central exterior piers of the building.

The Larkin Soap Company was founded in Buffalo in 1875 by John D. Larkin (1845–1926). The company would later expand into manufacturing other items, including groceries, dry goods, china, and furniture. The company became a national pioneer of the mail-order business model, with branches in Buffalo, New York, and Chicago. After failing to recover from the Great Depression, the company went into bankruptcy in 1943.

The City of Buffalo sold the building to the Western Trading Corporation in 1949 and, despite local and national protests, the architectural marvel was destroyed. Demolition of the Larkin Administration Building by the Morris and Reimann wrecking company took six months to complete. The demolition process took a very long time due to the fact that the building was built to last forever. Questions still remain today as to why it was torn down. The only part of the building that remains is a single brick pier along a railroad embankment. 
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TOP: Images courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Digital Assets Collection and Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Photographs by Jay W. Baxtresser, Albright Art Gallery staff.
BOTTOM: Screenshot of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s channel on Historypin.

Caught on Camera
September 16, 1988: Joan Mitchell

Artist Joan Mitchell (American, 1925–1992)
was present at the Albright-Knox on September 16, 1988, for the opening of her first major traveling retrospective, Joan Mitchell (September 17–November 6, 1988). The exhibition featured the boldly colorful and dramatic works of this inventive painter, considered internationally to be one of America’s leading Abstract Expressionists.

The exhibition featured approximately sixty paintings spanning thirty-six years of Mitchell’s career, including three works from the Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s permanent collection,  Blue Territory, 1972, and George Went Swimming at Barnes Hole But It Got Too Cold, 1957, both gifts of Seymour H. Knox II, and Rosebud, 1977„ a gift of Mr. and Mrs. Armand J. Castellani. The exhibition was organized by Dr. Judith A Bernstock, a guest curator for the Herbert F. Johnson Museums of Art at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, and was funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

TOP PHOTO: Former AK Chief Curator Michael Auping (left) and Administrator Judy Beecher (seated, left) join artist Joan Mitchell (seated, right) and guests at the Members’ Preview of Joan Mitchell on September 16, 1988.

Content taken from Albright-Knox Art Gallery Annual Report, 1988–1989. Images courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Digital Assets Collection and Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Photographs by Tom Loonan. 

Recent Acquisition HighlightsRodney Graham’s Welsh Oaks #1, 1998In 1979, Graham constructed a monumental, walk-in camera obscura from plywood in a field adjacent to his uncle’s ranch and positioned it in front of twelve different trees for one month. The public was invited to enter the camera to view the luminous image of the tree cast upside-down on the camera’s back wall. In the early 1990s, he again approached the subject, this time using a four-by-five large-format camera to produce a series of sepia-toned images of seven ancient oaks in the English countryside. Learn More Rodney Graham (Canadian, born 1949). Welsh Oaks #1, 1998. Chromogenic print, edition 1/2, 89 x 72 inches (226.1 x 182.9 cm). Albert H. Tracy Fund, by exchange and bequest of John Mortimer Schiff, by exchange, 2013. © Rodney Graham; courtesy Lisson Gallery 

Recent Acquisition Highlights
Rodney Graham’s Welsh Oaks #1, 1998

In 1979, Graham constructed a monumental, walk-in camera obscura from plywood in a field adjacent to his uncle’s ranch and positioned it in front of twelve different trees for one month. The public was invited to enter the camera to view the luminous image of the tree cast upside-down on the camera’s back wall. In the early 1990s, he again approached the subject, this time using a four-by-five large-format camera to produce a series of sepia-toned images of seven ancient oaks in the English countryside. Learn More 

Rodney Graham (Canadian, born 1949). Welsh Oaks #1, 1998. 
Chromogenic print, edition 1/2, 89 x 72 inches (226.1 x 182.9 cm). Albert H. Tracy Fund, by exchange and bequest of John Mortimer Schiff, by exchange, 2013. © Rodney Graham; courtesy Lisson Gallery 

AK Historypin of the Week
Wilcox Mansion, Delaware Avenue

The Albright Art Gallery (now the Albright-Knox Art Gallery) held an exhibition of photography in January 1940, which commemorated Buffalo’s vast architectural triumphs. Participants using the Historypin website and mobile app on supported devices can explore photographs and related content about numerous historic sites and buildings featured in the AAG’s 1940 exhibition. Every week, we will feature a pinned location from the Albright-Knox’s Historypin channel and provide detailed information and archival photographs about the site. This week’s pin is the Wilcox Mansion, located on Delaware Avenue.

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The building that now sits at 641 Delaware Avenue has changed greatly from the time of its original construction. The first thing built on the site was two family residences for officers in the temporary United States military barracks in the 1830s. The Buffalo or Poinsett Barracks, which extended from Main Street to Delaware Avenue and from North Street to Allen Street, were named after Joel Poinsett, the United States Secretary of War from 1837 to 1841. They were designed and constructed by the U.S. Army Engineers, under the direction of General Winfield Scott (1786–1866). The Buffalo or Poinsett Barracks were the largest U.S. military installation in the country at the time of construction.

In 1845, the Buffalo Barracks were moved to Fort Porter and the building was abandoned until 1847, when it was purchased by Joseph Masten (1809–1871), a former Mayor of Buffalo (serving 1843–1844 and 1845–1846) and a former judge of the Superior Court. The building was remodeled by Thomas Tilden (also known as George Thomas Tilden, 1845–1919) in 1863 and converted into a single family home. Masten had Tilden build the portico adorned with Doric columns on Delaware Avenue, making it the main entrance to the building. 

In 1883, Dexter Rumsey (1827–1906) purchased the house as a wedding present for his daughter, Mary Grace, and her husband, Ansley Wilcox (1856–1930). Ansley Wilcox was a lawyer and a civil service reform commissioner. Wilcox was also a founder of the Charity Organization Society and the Fitch Creche, the first day center for working mothers in the United States. Many of these reform groups met regularly at the Wilcox Mansion.

Ansley Wilcox made many improvements to the interior and exterior appearance of the house. In the 1890s, he built a large addition to the back that doubled the size of the residence. Around 1901, he enlisted the assistance of Buffalo architect George Cary (1859–1945) to rebuild the addition and remodel the interior. The addition consisted of a Gothic Revival morning room and a classical dining room, which contained intricate Georgian Revival woodwork details. During Ansley’s ownership of the property, the estate was visited by many prominent individuals, including President William Howard Taft and Secretary of State Philander Knox.

In 1901, the mansion became a monument of national importance due a horrible tragedy. After the shooting of President William McKinley at the Pan-American Exposition on September 6, Vice President Theodore Roosevelt traveled to Buffalo to be present in the event that the wound was fatal. Since Roosevelt was a close friend of Wilcox, he stayed at the Wilcox Mansion during this time. When President McKinley died on September 14, 1901, Roosevelt took the oath of office in the library of the Wilcox Mansion at 3:30 pm to become the twenty-sixth president of the United States.

In 1966, the house—which is the best remaining example of the Greek Revival style in Buffalo—was named a National Historic Site. The building is currently a museum, operated by the Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Site Foundation, Inc., on behalf of the National Park Service and the United States Department of the Interior. The library in which Roosevelt was sworn into office has been remodeled back to its appearance at the time of that momentous event.
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TOP: Image courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Digital Assets Collection and Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Photograph by Jay W. Baxtresser, Albright Art Gallery staff.
BOTTOM: Screenshot of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s channel on Historypin.

Caught on CameraJuly 1951: Delaware Park Rose Garden Art ShowDuring the summer of 1951, the Albright Art Gallery sponsored the second annual Rose Garden Art Show. This sidewalk sale and exhibition of artwork by local artists occurred in the Delaware Park Rose Garden on July 24 and 25, from 6 pm until dark. One of the main draws of the exhibition was that featured art was priced for the “average pocketbook.”
The art show was open to all ages and urged all artists, amateur or professional, to bring their paintings, sculptures, and sketches to the open air show in the park. The exhibition featured not only art, but also included a variety of musical and dramatic entertainment. The 1951 Rose Garden Art Show featured more than 150 artists. More than 5,000 people attended and more than 200 artworks were sold.
The original 1950 art show was organized by Edgar C. Schenck, Director of the Albright Art Gallery, and the second show in 1951 was organized by James Vullo, an instructor at the Buffalo Art Institute. On the evenings of July 24 and 25, 1951, Mrs. Sydney Owen Jennings sketched portraits of visitors to the exhibit, including AAG Director Edgar Schenck (above).
Photo scanned from Albright Art Gallery, Gallery Notes, Annual Report, Volume XV, No. 3, 1949–1952, October 1951. Image courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Digital Assets Collection and Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery

Caught on Camera
July 1951: Delaware Park Rose Garden Art Show

During the summer of 1951, the Albright Art Gallery sponsored the second annual Rose Garden Art Show. This sidewalk sale and exhibition of artwork by local artists occurred in the Delaware Park Rose Garden on July 24 and 25, from 6 pm until dark. One of the main draws of the exhibition was that featured art was priced for the “average pocketbook.”

The art show was open to all ages and urged all artists, amateur or professional, to bring their paintings, sculptures, and sketches to the open air show in the park. The exhibition featured not only art, but also included a variety of musical and dramatic entertainment. The 1951 Rose Garden Art Show featured more than 150 artists. More than 5,000 people attended and more than 200 artworks were sold.

The original 1950 art show was organized by Edgar C. Schenck, Director of the Albright Art Gallery, and the second show in 1951 was organized by James Vullo, an instructor at the Buffalo Art Institute. On the evenings of July 24 and 25, 1951, Mrs. Sydney Owen Jennings sketched portraits of visitors to the exhibit, including AAG Director Edgar Schenck (above).

Photo scanned from Albright Art Gallery, Gallery Notes, Annual Report, Volume XV, No. 3, 1949–1952, October 1951. Image courtesy of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Digital Assets Collection and Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery

#InternAK
A Day in the Life of Hannah, Summer Intern for the Publications Department 

1. Hi there, this is Hannah and I am thrilled to take over the AK’s Instagram account today! I was an Intern at the AK over the summer and I worked on a variety of different projects for the Publications Department, concentrating on the museum’s Digital Assets Collection. It was a wonderful experience and I recommend the program to anyone interested. I was able not only to create content for the museum’s social media platforms, but also preserve analog media through digitization! How great is that?!? 

2. Here is a small sampling of the numerous 35mm slides recently given to the Publications Department from the Education Department. This collection of slides features works not only owned by the AK, but also includes many other famous artworks from art collections around the world! It will be a great resource for art lovers and art educators! 

3. For much of this past summer, I spent a lot of quality time with artwork transparencies. Part of my intern project was to complete an inventory of the museum’s transparency collection and compare photography of artworks against the AK’s collections management database. Believe me, you sure get familiar with the museum’s Fine Art Collection really quickly that way! (Here are a few illuminated by a light box that feature AK artworks by the painter Sam Francis.) 

4. More slides! This drawer contains slides of vintage photographs from past AK Members Only Exhibition Previews and Receptions from the 1970s and 1980s. With artists like Sonia Delaunay and Piero Dorazio, it’s not hard to see why these exhibitions attracted so many people! After a lot of hard work, all of these slides have been scanned and now contain essential metadata. 

5. In my final #InternAK post, I wanted to share one of the best experiences I have had while working here at the AK. On July 5, I was able to volunteer at the opening celebration for the exhibition Sincerely Yours: Treasures of the Queen City. The event offered me a wonderful opportunity to experience Lucas Samaras’s Room No. 2 (popularly known as the Mirrored Room), 1966, first hand. It was great to see how many people lined up to step inside!

Follow the Albright-Knox on Instagram (@AlbrightKnox) for more behind-the-scenes photos!

Photographs by Hannah Sigurdson. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery