Happy birthday Vincent van Gogh! The Dutch artist was born on this day in 1853. The above work is inscribed with the title and artist’s signature in the lower left corner and the words Ton grisatre, or “greyish tone,” in the lower right corner.
Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853–1890)Woman Cleaning a Cauldron (Femme nettoyant son chaudron), 1883–1885Charcoal on paperCharles Clifton and Albert H. Tracy Funds, 1946

Happy birthday Vincent van Gogh! The Dutch artist was born on this day in 1853. The above work is inscribed with the title and artist’s signature in the lower left corner and the words Ton grisatre, or “greyish tone,” in the lower right corner.

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 18531890)
Woman Cleaning a Cauldron (Femme nettoyant son chaudron), 18831885
Charcoal on paper
Charles Clifton and Albert H. Tracy Funds, 1946

#BehindtheArt

As part of #MuseumWeek, today’s #BehindtheArt feature highlights the history of two of the early winners in our #ArtMadness competition! On Tuesday, Jaume Plensa’s Laura, 2012, swept past Jason Middlebrook’s Underlife, 2012–13, for the win. Yesterday’s heated competition produced Do Ho Suh’s Karma, 2010, as the victor. Learn more about these two magnificent works from our Collection in these Behind the Work posts:
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Behind the Work: Jaume Plensa’s Laura, 2012

image Behind the Work: Do Ho Suh’s Karma, 2010

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TOP: Jaume Plensa (Spanish, born 1955). Laura, 2012. Marble, lead, and stainless steel. George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, by exchange, 2012. © 2012 Jaume Plensa.
BOTTOM: Do Ho Suh (Korean, born 1962). Karma, 2010. Bronze, edition 1/3. Bequest of Arthur B. Michael, by exchange, 2010. © 2010 Do Ho Suh. Photographs by Tom Loonan.

Army P-39 Airacobra Show
November 18, 1942December 8, 1942

This exhibition, shown in November 1942, dramatized one of Buffalo’s major contributions to the war effort. Organized by the museum in cooperation with the Bell Aircraft Corporation, the exhibition was comprised of photo-enlargements showing the development of the Airacobra airplane from drafting board to flight. Beginning with the full scale outline, significant steps in the making of the plane were pictured, from the preparation of the parts for the assembly line to the point where the plane rolls onto the field for testing. A series of flight shots, views of the plane being created and shipped, and finally performance in foreign fields completed the exhibition. 

Supplementing the show was a display of miniature models of leading types of foreign and American planes hand carved by students in the Buffalo Public Schools, under the aegis of the US Office of Education, Washington, D.C., and the US Navy Bureau of Aeronautics. The showing of these models at the museum was sponsored by the Buffalo Chapter of the Junior Red Cross. An all-color sound movie of the Airacobra, “Cannon on Wings,” was shown twice a day during the exhibition, and 2,200 color reproductions of the plane were given out to children, courtesy of the Bell Aircraft Corporation. 

The potentialities for morale building on the home front were quickly grasped by exhibitors during the war. These potentialities were clearly demonstrated in Buffalo, where special days were set aside for employees of sub-contractors to the Bell Aircraft Corporation to visit the exhibition, as well for students in the industrial arts classes throughout the city.  

Numerous requests from museums throughout the country led to the museum circulating the exhibition. Beginning with Pine Camp (now Fort Drum, New York) for soldiers, it then traveled in February to the Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica, New York in November 1943. The exhibition would eventually travel to the Addison Gallery of American Art, Philips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts; the George Walter Vincent Smith Art Gallery, Springfield, Massachusetts; the Currier Gallery of Art, Manchester, New Hampshire; Carolina Art Association, Gibbes Memorial Art Gallery, Charleston, South Carolina; Brooks Memorial Art Gallery, Memphis, Tennessee; Telfair Academy of Arts and Sciences, Savannah, Georgia; and the Municipal Art Museum, Wichita, Kansas.

For more on how the Albright Art Gallery supported the war effort, visit the exhibition Buffalo’s Monuments Men, on view through April 6, 2014.

Images: Installation views of Airacobra (Albright Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York, November 18, 1942–December 8, 1942). Images courtesy of the G. Robert Strauss, Jr. Memorial Library, Gallery Archives, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery.

Content for this exhibition description was taken from The Buffalo Fine Arts Academy, Gallery Notes, Albright Art Gallery. Vol. X, No. 1, May 1943, p. 10. 

Welcome to Buffalo, NCAA March Madness fans! While you’re visiting our wonderful city, take an art break and visit the Albright-Knox! #buffhoops

This work by David Hammons consists of a sheet of paper ten-feet high covered with dirt from Harlem by bouncing a basketball on it, then framed, matted, and hung on a gallery wall with an old suitcase behind it. Learn more in our Collection Highlights.

David Hammons (American, born 1943). Basketball Drawing, 2001. Harlem earth on paper, found suitcase. George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, 2001


The Albright-Knox’s latest exhibition, One Another: Spiderlike, I Spin Mirrors, opened at the beginning of March. The exhibition’s title is inspired by a photograph by Janine Antoni (Bahamian, born 1964) and the poem “Childless Woman” by Sylvia Plath (American, 1932–1963). One Another considers the artistic impulses of some of the most influential female artists of our time, placing an emphasis on relationships, both real and imagined. The artists featured in One Another are mindful of the social roles they inhabit as women and artists. Their works provide moments for reflection upon our own relationships and humanity. Using a variety of media—drawing, sculpture, painting, photography, and performance—the works in this exhibition explore themes of empowerment, self-preservation, memory, sexuality, and transformation. Spanning generations and cultures, the creative impulses of these artists serve as strong visual meditations on women, beauty, decay, and the restorative qualities of art. Louise Bourgeois’s Couple II, 1966, seen above, served as the inspiration for the exhibition. The work, in which two anthropomorphic beings are engaged in an intimate embrace, recreates a personal experience stemming from a child’s confusion about adult love and sexuality, and is also a comment about the imbalance in relationships. By adding a prosthetic brace to the leg of the female figure, Bourgeois imbues the figure with infirmity while giving the strength and power to the male figure. The brace could also serve as a metaphor for emotional barriers and perhaps even the figure’s helplessness in the relationship.One Another: Spiderlike, I Spin Mirrors is on view through June 1, 2014. Louise Bourgeois (American, born France, 1911–2010). Couple II, 1966. Fabric, knee brace, glass, and wood. Sarah Norton Goodyear Fund, 1999.

The Albright-Knox’s latest exhibition, One Another: Spiderlike, I Spin Mirrors, opened at the beginning of March. The exhibition’s title is inspired by a photograph by Janine Antoni (Bahamian, born 1964) and the poem “Childless Woman” by Sylvia Plath (American, 1932–1963). One Another considers the artistic impulses of some of the most influential female artists of our time, placing an emphasis on relationships, both real and imagined. The artists featured in One Another are mindful of the social roles they inhabit as women and artists. Their works provide moments for reflection upon our own relationships and humanity. Using a variety of media—drawing, sculpture, painting, photography, and performance—the works in this exhibition explore themes of empowerment, self-preservation, memory, sexuality, and transformation. Spanning generations and cultures, the creative impulses of these artists serve as strong visual meditations on women, beauty, decay, and the restorative qualities of art.

Louise Bourgeois’s Couple II, 1966, seen above, served as the inspiration for the exhibition. The work, in which two anthropomorphic beings are engaged in an intimate embrace, recreates a personal experience stemming from a child’s confusion about adult love and sexuality, and is also a comment about the imbalance in relationships. By adding a prosthetic brace to the leg of the female figure, Bourgeois imbues the figure with infirmity while giving the strength and power to the male figure. The brace could also serve as a metaphor for emotional barriers and perhaps even the figure’s helplessness in the relationship.

One Another: Spiderlike, I Spin Mirrors
is on view through June 1, 2014. 

Louise Bourgeois (American, born France, 1911–2010). Couple II, 1966. Fabric, knee brace, glass, and wood. Sarah Norton Goodyear Fund, 1999.

Hey, Buffalo: Dr. Janne Sirén (2013–present) On January 14, 2013, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery announced the appointment of Dr. Janne Sirén as its eleventh director and the first to receive the title of Peggy Pierce Elfvin Director. Dr. Sirén is the first director from the Nordic region and believes passionately in the arts, visual literacy, and the idea that the twenty-first-century museum can be an active participant in a vibrant community and can add to its robust growth. He recently launched an exciting new Director’s Lecture Series as well as other community-based campaigns such as the Response Room in the exhibition Anselm Kiefer: Beyond Landscape. By providing visitors with a unique opportunity to learn about the history of museums, he hopes to demonstrate the close bonds between the Albright-Knox Art Gallery and the Buffalo Niagara region, and continue to increase the museum’s presence on regional, national, and international stages.
For more information on past directors’ numerous accomplishments, check out the Directors of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery timeline, created with Tiki-Toki.  

Hey, Buffalo: Dr. Janne Sirén (2013–present) 

On January 14, 2013, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery announced the appointment of Dr. Janne Sirén as its eleventh director and the first to receive the title of Peggy Pierce Elfvin Director. Dr. Sirén is the first director from the Nordic region and believes passionately in the arts, visual literacy, and the idea that the twenty-first-century museum can be an active participant in a vibrant community and can add to its robust growth. He recently launched an exciting new Director’s Lecture Series as well as other community-based campaigns such as the Response Room in the exhibition Anselm Kiefer: Beyond Landscape. By providing visitors with a unique opportunity to learn about the history of museums, he hopes to demonstrate the close bonds between the Albright-Knox Art Gallery and the Buffalo Niagara region, and continue to increase the museum’s presence on regional, national, and international stages.

For more information on past directors’ numerous accomplishments, check out the Directors of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery timeline, created with Tiki-Toki.  

Sandra Cinto, Tempest in Red, 2009
The beautifully rendered silver lines of Sandra Cinto’s Tempest in Red depict a seascape of swirling waves, rain, and wind that are intended to remind the viewer of the powerful and overwhelming forces of nature. This work is one of many from the Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s Collection featured in the exhibition Anselm Kiefer: Beyond Landscape that illustrates how artists have used landscape to explore a variety of themes. Here, Cinto uses her landscape to explore the notion of the sublime and the awe-inspiring, magnificent power of nature.Sandra Cinto (Brazilian, born 1968). Tempest in Red, 2009. Acrylic and permanent pen on canvas. Elisabeth H. Gates Fund, by exchange, Fellows for Life Fund, by exchange, James G. Forsyth Fund, by exchange, Gift of Demotte and Company, by Exchange, Charles Clifton and James G. Forsyth Fund, by exchange, George Cary Fund, by exchange, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Lucien Garo, by exchange, Evelyn Rumsey Cary Fund, by exchange and Norman E. Boasberg Fund, by exchange, 2011. © 2009 Sandra Cinto, courtesy Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York.

Sandra Cinto, Tempest in Red, 2009

The beautifully rendered silver lines of Sandra Cinto’s Tempest in Red depict a seascape of swirling waves, rain, and wind that are intended to remind the viewer of the powerful and overwhelming forces of nature. This work is one of many from the Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s Collection featured in the exhibition Anselm Kiefer: Beyond Landscape that illustrates how artists have used landscape to explore a variety of themes. Here, Cinto uses her landscape to explore the notion of the sublime and the awe-inspiring, magnificent power of nature.

Sandra Cinto (Brazilian, born 1968). Tempest in Red, 2009. Acrylic and permanent pen on canvas. Elisabeth H. Gates Fund, by exchange, Fellows for Life Fund, by exchange, James G. Forsyth Fund, by exchange, Gift of Demotte and Company, by Exchange, Charles Clifton and James G. Forsyth Fund, by exchange, George Cary Fund, by exchange, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Lucien Garo, by exchange, Evelyn Rumsey Cary Fund, by exchange and Norman E. Boasberg Fund, by exchange, 2011. © 2009 Sandra Cinto, courtesy Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York.